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The KFD Library ...

  • Abarat (Abarat)
     
  • Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War - Book Two [ABARAT]
    by Clive(Author) ; Barker, Clive(Illustrator) Barker
     
  • The Alexandria Link: A Novel
    by Steve Berry

    I don't get a great deal of time to read fiction, but when I do I love to read Steve Berry. His books are just so easy to read and get into. The plots are always great and steeped in history.

     
  • Animal Farm: Centennial Edition
     
  • The Back of the Napkin (Expanded Edition): Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures
     
  • Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy
    by Martin Lindstrom
    Martin Lindstrom presents an amazing education in consumerism that we should all take a moment to learn. From the very first case concerning the effectiveness of anti-smoking campaigns to the very end of the book, I was hooked. I found myself finding insight to my own hidden tendencies at the register and also to how I think about positioning MY services for sale.
    If you are a consumer, you should read Buy-ology!

    Martin Lindstrom presents an amazing education in consumerism that we should all take a moment to learn. From the very first case concerning the effectiveness of anti-smoking campaigns to the very end of the book, I was hooked. I found myself finding insight to my own hidden tendencies at the register and also to how I think about positioning MY services for sale.
    If you are a consumer, you should read Buy-ology!

     
  • Call of the Wild: A Mutts Treasury
     
  • By Steve Berry: The Charlemagne Pursuit: A Novel
    Hardcover
    Another fantastic romp through adventure, intrigue and history. Berry's Cotton Malone takes adventure fiction to a whole new height!
    If you are into historical fiction and like a speck of adventure on top, the Steve Berry's books are a must read!

    Another fantastic romp through adventure, intrigue and history. Berry's Cotton Malone takes adventure fiction to a whole new height!
    If you are into historical fiction and like a speck of adventure on top, the Steve Berry's books are a must read!

     
  • Chosen by a Horse
    by Susan Richards
    Such a touching and heart wrenching story about a woman who takes in a horse and learns the special bond that these creatures bring to us. 
    I cried at the end. It was that damn good.

    Such a touching and heart wrenching story about a woman who takes in a horse and learns the special bond that these creatures bring to us. 
    I cried at the end. It was that damn good.

     
  • The Cluetrain Manifesto: 10th Anniversary Edition
    by Rick Levine, Christopher Locke, Doc Searls, David Weinberger, McKee Jake
    Probably one of the quintessential collaborative works of the Internet age. Long before Web 2.0 was a term being used by the mass media, these four men envisioned the future. What makes this 10th anniversary edition so exceptional is the return these authors make to re-examine their original work.
    Having read the book I can now count myself as one of the many who say "Cluetrain verbalized a sentiment I've had for many years in a way that just made simple sense." From business to business relationships to personal relationships and how this information laden ages affects us all, Cluetrain had some pretty deep insights 10 years ago.
    For people who can't imagine that a book can make so much sense allow me to quote a popular movie:
    "I know *exactly* what you mean. Let me tell you why you're here. You're here because you know something. What you know you can't explain, but you feel it. You've felt it your entire life, that there's something wrong with the world. You don't know what it is, but it's there, like a splinter in your mind, driving you mad." ~ The Matrix (1999)
    I did know. Now I understand it also.

    Probably one of the quintessential collaborative works of the Internet age. Long before Web 2.0 was a term being used by the mass media, these four men envisioned the future. What makes this 10th anniversary edition so exceptional is the return these authors make to re-examine their original work.
    Having read the book I can now count myself as one of the many who say "Cluetrain verbalized a sentiment I've had for many years in a way that just made simple sense." From business to business relationships to personal relationships and how this information laden ages affects us all, Cluetrain had some pretty deep insights 10 years ago.
    For people who can't imagine that a book can make so much sense allow me to quote a popular movie:
    "I know *exactly* what you mean. Let me tell you why you're here. You're here because you know something. What you know you can't explain, but you feel it. You've felt it your entire life, that there's something wrong with the world. You don't know what it is, but it's there, like a splinter in your mind, driving you mad." ~ The Matrix (1999)
    I did know. Now I understand it also.

     
  • Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age [Hardcover]
     
  • Do the Work
    by Steven Pressfield
     
  • Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers
    by Dave Gray, Sunni Brown, James Macanufo
    First off, this is a fine book. It covers several theories and practices of getting teams together and having them hash out creative problems. The first 1/3 of the book covers the theories, some history, and the skill sets necesary to understand and implement these tools.
    The remainder of the book is a list of "games" with thoughtful, but brief, outlines concerning use, rules and goals. Really these are some great ideas but I found most of them to be too "touchy feeling" for the engineering industry. That's not to say it's not good material.
    What I am angry with is how mislead I was by the Amazon video trailer. That advertisement leads you to believe the book covers or shares insight into how firms like Google, Microsoft and others apply these tools to benefit. I was expecting more use case and less list of games.
    I recommend the book, but be sure you know what you are ordering.

    First off, this is a fine book. It covers several theories and practices of getting teams together and having them hash out creative problems. The first 1/3 of the book covers the theories, some history, and the skill sets necesary to understand and implement these tools.
    The remainder of the book is a list of "games" with thoughtful, but brief, outlines concerning use, rules and goals. Really these are some great ideas but I found most of them to be too "touchy feeling" for the engineering industry. That's not to say it's not good material.
    What I am angry with is how mislead I was by the Amazon video trailer. That advertisement leads you to believe the book covers or shares insight into how firms like Google, Microsoft and others apply these tools to benefit. I was expecting more use case and less list of games.
    I recommend the book, but be sure you know what you are ordering.

     
  • The Hobbit
    by J. R. R. Tolkien
     
  • The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (Gollancz Sf S.)
    by Robert Rankin

    A strange mystery set in an alternate world where toys inhabit a city and someone is committing murder. Eddy Bear is one of the most endearing sleuths you'll encounter for a long time to come.

     
  • Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal
    by Christopher Moore

    A fantastically whimsical attempt to fill the void in the story of Jesus' life and ministry. Wonderfully brilliant and heretical.

     
  • Lapsing Into a Comma : A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print--and How to Avoid Them
    by Bill Walsh

    A must read for anyone looking to improve the quality of their writing without the pain of a journalism degree. Walsh speaks to the reader in a way that lacks pretension and is very agreeable. He goes as far as to nearly make the topic matter fun.

     
  • Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?
    by Seth Godin

    In the world of business and marketing minds, there is none more dynamic or prolyphic than Seth Godin. In Linchpin Godin speaks in a language anyone can understand and explains why each of us can can be indespensible. Whether you are in business for yourself or working for someone else Linchpin is a must read.

     
  • Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
    by Chip Heath, Dan Heath

    Made to Stick is a well thought out and informative book, but a little on the dry side. I will say that I walked away with one really insightful bit of information, and really, isn't that more than you can ask for these days?

     
  • Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything
    by Joshua Foer
    What can you say about a book that turns out to be nothing like you expected, but was fantastic none the less? 
    Foyer takes the reader on a profound personal journey over the course of his year of mental training. And while there is comparatively little "instruction" in the text, the narrative is a must read. 
    On the way to the US Memory championships Foyer introduces the reader to historical and contemporary characters. Some of whom are touching in their own right, others seem to deserve the disdain they earn. But most interestingly, Foyer introduces the reader to a little bit of himself.
    Perhaps this book isn't the great mental treatise that some would expect. But it is definitely worth reading. And if you aren't careful you just mind find yourself keeping time with Foyer as he dances with Einstein.

    What can you say about a book that turns out to be nothing like you expected, but was fantastic none the less? 
    Foyer takes the reader on a profound personal journey over the course of his year of mental training. And while there is comparatively little "instruction" in the text, the narrative is a must read. 
    On the way to the US Memory championships Foyer introduces the reader to historical and contemporary characters. Some of whom are touching in their own right, others seem to deserve the disdain they earn. But most interestingly, Foyer introduces the reader to a little bit of himself.
    Perhaps this book isn't the great mental treatise that some would expect. But it is definitely worth reading. And if you aren't careful you just mind find yourself keeping time with Foyer as he dances with Einstein.

     
  • The Paris Vendetta: A Novel
    by Steve Berry
    Another fantastically written romp through the world of Cotton Mallone. If you like historical fiction mixed with some modern intrigue then you can't pass up this or any Steve Berry book.
    When I have time to read fiction I reach for Steve Berry first.

    Another fantastically written romp through the world of Cotton Mallone. If you like historical fiction mixed with some modern intrigue then you can't pass up this or any Steve Berry book.
    When I have time to read fiction I reach for Steve Berry first.

     
  • Poke the Box
    by Seth Godin

    Another great effort by Seth Godin and a very fast read. When I first saw this book it really looked more like a children's book than a collection of provocative, business-related concepts. In truth, Poke the Box is more like a collection of Godin's blog posts than a traditional "book", which is in no way a bad thing.

     
  • Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance - Now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem!
    by Jane Austen, Seth Grahame-Smith

    This pop-culture phenomenon is mildly entertaining, at best. It takes the basic, already tedious concept of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and sprinkles the undead over it. Unfortunately the undead do nothing to make this story more interesting. Be prepared for the typical pompous assery that made early 19th century literature famous. I guess if you were a fan of Jane Austen and zombies it might be worth $1 to buy at a used bookstore.

     
  • Red and Rover: A Boy, A Dog, A Time, A Feeling
    by Brian Basset

    "Red and Rover" is probably the sweetest, cutest comic strip ever. the way Brian Basset captures the friedship between a boy and his dog is pure magic. Even as an adult when I read "Red and Rover" it makes me miss my own dog and want to go home to give him a hug. Red and Rover picks up where "Calvin and Hobbes" left off. This is a must read for a comic or pet lover.

     
  • Rework
    by Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson
    This is one of the best and fastest reads I've had in a long while. An average reader can blow through this book in a day or two.
    Fried and Hansson definitely have the pedigree to offer business advice having founded 37Signals. The entire book is written in a casual, conversational manner. Reading it is like having lunch with a friend that is giving you good advice.
    If you are in business, then you need ReWork.

    This is one of the best and fastest reads I've had in a long while. An average reader can blow through this book in a day or two.
    Fried and Hansson definitely have the pedigree to offer business advice having founded 37Signals. The entire book is written in a casual, conversational manner. Reading it is like having lunch with a friend that is giving you good advice.
    If you are in business, then you need ReWork.